alicia_marie
galacticpictures:

Cosmic Kitten!

galacticpictures:

Cosmic Kitten!

knifeson:

Daft Punk at Grammy 2014

knifeson:

Daft Punk at Grammy 2014

itsjustcharli:

http://wp.me/s27lDw-161
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medicalschool:

The Method of Plastination

Plastination is a relatively simple process designed to preserve the body for educational and instructional purposes. Plastination, like many revolutionary inventions, is simple in concept:

1. Embalming and Anatomical Dissection

The first step of the process involves halting decay by pumping formalin into the body through the arteries. Formalin kills all bacteria and chemically stops the decay of tissue. Using dissection tools, the skin, fatty and connective tissues are removed in order to prepare the individual anatomical structures.

2. Removal of Body Fat and Water

In the first step, the body water and soluble fats are dissolved from the body by placing it into a solvent bath (e.g., an acetone bath).

3. Forced Impregnation

This second exchange process is the central step in Plastination. During forced impregnation a reactive polymer, e.g., silicone rubber, replaces the acetone. To achieve this, the specimen is immersed in a polymer solution and placed in vacuum chamber. The vacuum removes the acetone from the specimen and helps the polymer to penetrate every last cell.

4. Positioning

After vacuum impregnation, the body is positioned as desired. Every single anatomical structure is properly aligned and fixed with the help of wires, needles, clamps, and foam blocks.

5. Curing (Hardening)

In the final step, the specimen is hardened. Depending on the polymer used, this is done with gas, light, or heat. Dissection and Plastination of an entire body requires about 1,500 working hours and normally takes about one year to complete.

So cool but so creepy!

Creepy!

Creepy!

So, before a project, I should have a beer, then coffee! 

headlikeanorange:

Supercell near Booker, Texas (Mike Olbinski)

WOW

headlikeanorange:

Supercell near Booker, Texas (Mike Olbinski)

WOW

instagram:

Dutch Artist Florentijn Hofman’s Duck Visits Hong Kong

To view more photos of the famed rubber ducky, be sure to visit the Harbour City 海港城 location page and browse the #florentijnhofman hashtag.

Since the beginning of May, Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman’s 16-meter (52-foot) rubber duck has turned Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour into a giant bathtub. Instagrammers there have captured the giant duck’s daily travels about the harbor and were on hand to photograph its deflation in mid-May (part of scheduled maintenance work according to the exhibition organizers).

The giant rubber ducky has been touring the globe since 2007, making appearances in Osaka, Sydney, Sao Paulo, and Amsterdam before coming to Hong Kong. The artist hopes the work will make people feel young again, bring them together and encourage a connection with public art. The duck will leave Hong Kong on June 9 and heads to the United States next.

Just :(

medicalschool:

Image of the Week: Microscopic view of lung surfactant
This microscopic image of lung surfactant, a lipid-protein material that reduces surface tension in the lung and aids in proper pulmonary function, could easily be mistaken for a whimsical textile print. A recent issue of Biomedical Beat provides more information about the fanciful designs represented in the image and how they may offer insights into developing new methods for drug delivery:

Using microscopy techniques, the researchers captured a snapshot of the changes that occur (black) when surfactant molecules are stressed by carbon nanoparticles. The scientists found that if inhaled, carbon nanoparticles could influence the function of the main lipid component of surfactant. A likely gateway for nanoparticles to enter the body is through the lungs, so this and future studies may help scientists improve drug delivery methods.

Photo by University of Kansas State

medicalschool:

Image of the Week: Microscopic view of lung surfactant

This microscopic image of lung surfactant, a lipid-protein material that reduces surface tension in the lung and aids in proper pulmonary function, could easily be mistaken for a whimsical textile print. A recent issue of Biomedical Beat provides more information about the fanciful designs represented in the image and how they may offer insights into developing new methods for drug delivery:

Using microscopy techniques, the researchers captured a snapshot of the changes that occur (black) when surfactant molecules are stressed by carbon nanoparticles. The scientists found that if inhaled, carbon nanoparticles could influence the function of the main lipid component of surfactant. A likely gateway for nanoparticles to enter the body is through the lungs, so this and future studies may help scientists improve drug delivery methods.

Photo by University of Kansas State